Herby sweet potato wedges

They’re not just delicious, but they pack a powerful nutritional punch – just one medium sweet potato provides 400% of your daily needs for vitamin A! These special spuds are also rich in the antioxidant lycopene and fibre providing a whopping 6g per medium veggie. And, the potassium they contain can counteract sodium and may help to promote a healthy blood pressure. More and more research suggests that getting enough potassium from a diet rich in veggies and fruits could be just as important as reducing sodium intake as far as preventing high blood pressure is concerned. Yes, they contain more sugars but they actually have a low glycaemic index so they won’t spike your blood glucose levels. nutritionally speaking, sweet potatoes are a fab choice.

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Tasty herby sweet potato wedges

 

Try this tasty recipe for herby sweet potato wedges.

 

Ingredients

2 sweet potatoes, cut into wedges

4 tbsp olive oil

1 tbsp fresh thyme or rosemary leaves

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

 

Method

Preheat the oven to 200C/gas mark 6.

Cut the washed potatoes into wedges and place in a roasting tin.

Drizzle with oil and use your hands to ensure they’re coated well.

Sprinkle with herbs and season well with salt and freshly cracked black pepper.

Roast in the oven for 15-20 minutes, until lightly golden.

Four ways to boost your probiotic pals

Veggie-based foods are good for the planet and better for animals. Yep, we all know that. But did you know it’s also better for the animals that live inside you?

We’re talking about the 100 trillion microbes that live on and in you – and particularly live in the intestines. And just like you need to eat, so do your gut bacteria.

 

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A delicious way to boost your probiotic pals!

 

 

More and more research is proving what ancient cultures have known since history began. That feeding the right bacteria can have profound effects on your health – from your body weight to your mood , reducing the production of compounds that trigger with inflammation and a vital part of your immune system. Plus, certain foods, the ones that contain resistant starch, are favourite foods for your probiotic people. Resistant starch might even help the body absorb more minerals .

Fibre only comes from plant foods – it is a range of plant materials that your body can’t digest. So, they reach the large intestine virtually unchanged and here, they provide food for gut bacteria.

Here’s how you can boost the fibre and the nourishment for your little guys:
1. Eat fewer white flour foods (which have had the fibre and nutrients removed from the unprocessed, natural flour). These don’t feed your probiotic microbes. And without food, they won’t survive and this can have major effects on your health and mood.
2. Love your legumes. Pulses and lentils contain soluble fibre, which probiotics love to eat . Add lentils and beans to your salads, soups and more.
3. Treat your probiotics with special starch. Some foods are especially rich in resistant starch including artichokes, asparagus, leeks, chicory, onions, garlic, bananas, oats, wheat, lentils and pulses – chickpeas and beans.
4. Love chocolate Dark chocolate (fair trade and organic please) are rich a great snack – rich in antioxidant flavonoids for you, rich in resistant start for your probiotic pals.

Spicy aloo (potato) tikki

 

The only trouble with these is that you could be cooking them all day since the family keep eating them. Totally yummy and extremely addictive – i dont know anyone who doesnt love these. Honest.

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Ingredients

Light olive oil for frying

1 tsp cumin seeds

1 onion, finely chopped

2 tsp garam masala

2 tsp chili powder

3 tsp salt

Large handful of coriander, finely chopped

Juice of half a lemon

Three or more green chilies, sliced

I kg of waxy potatoes (baked in their skins in a tray with salt added to the tray to draw out the moisture), then peeled and mashed – this helps to ensure that the potatoes don’t get too wet).

1 cup gram (chickpea) flour

 

Method

Fry the cumin seeds in hot oil until they crackle

Add the onions and fry unit golden brown.

Stir in the, garam masala, salt, chili.

Place the potato into a bowl and spoon the onion mixture onto it; stir to combine evenly.

Cover and allow the mixture to chill for half an hour or so to help firm up the mixture and make it easier to work with.

Add the lemon juice and coriander leaves (leaving these until just before cooking helps the leaves to stay fragrant).

To make the coating, pour the gram flour in a bowl and using a whisk, add enough water to form a thick, sticky, smooth batter.

Heat the oil in a large fry pan.

Take a palm size piece of potato and form into a patty.

Then dip into the batter so that the potato mixture is covered as well as possible. If the potato mixture starts to fall apart, place tikkies into the hot oil and pour two or so teaspoons of the batter on each tikki. Cook for around five minutes or until golden, turn and add more of the batter. Carefully tilt the pan from time to time as you cook to make sure that the sides of the tikki are cooked, too.

Remove with a slotted spoon and drain on kitchen paper.

Serve with fresh lemon juice and chili sauce or mint or tamarind chutney.

Spicy carrot pickle

Enjoy as an accompaniment to Indian breads such as parathas or with rice. Or enjoy on its own or with a cold beer. For me, this spicy carrot pickle is just right when you fancy chips. I go carrot pickle instead!

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Ingredients

2 tsp fenugreek seeds

2 tsp black mustard seeds

Half a teaspoon nigella seeds

Quarter of a teaspoon of asafoetida

Quarter of a teaspoon turmeric powder

1 tsp chilli powder

Half a tsp salt

Three carrots, peeled and cut into batons

1 and a half tablespoons olive oil, heated

1 tbsp olive oil, heated

2 tbsp red wine vinegar

Method

Roughly grind the fenugreek, mustard and nigella seeds in a pestle and mortar then pour into a mixing bowl.

Ad the asafoetida, turmeric, chilli powder and salt.

Add the carrots.

Add the hot oil and stir to mix.

Add the vinegar and stir to combine.

Serve immediately or stop in an airtight container in the fridge for up to a week.

 

Petis pois and cashew nut pesto

This fresh pesto is easy and tastes wonderfully fresh. Enjoy with pasta or rice or add a little more oil and dip it! This recipe make lots of pesto so half it or store half in an airtight jar for up to two day.

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Ingredients

4 garlic cloves

One bunch of basil leaves

One bunch of coriander leaves

1 x 400g frozen edamame (soya beans), thawed

Large handful of cashew nuts

Juice of one lemon lemon juice

2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

1 tsp salt

Freshly ground black pepper

 

Method

Using a food processor, pulse the garlic, basil and coriander. Spoon into a large bowl.

Now crumb the cashew nuts in the food processor and add to the herb mix.

Stir in the lemon juice, olive oil, salt and pepper.

Add more olive oil if you like a little more moisture.

Serve as a sauce or a dip.